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SYLLABUS FOR E316-TR SHAKESPEARE, CSU FULLERTON FALL 2007 (UPDATED 10/29/10)

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BASIC INFORMATION

Note: all links have been removed from this archival copy, but the author questions (bundled according to subject/period) and study guides referenced below can be found in relevant sections of the Resource Gallery. Instructions pages for journals, presentations, etc. were similar to those available in my current courses. MP3 audio of sessions has been removed. My blog entries for most courses are available from the Blogs Index.

Course Information. English 316, Course Code 13061. Tues./Thurs. 2:30-3:45 p.m., McCarthy Hall 617. Office hrs: Thurs. 5:00-6:00 in University Hall 329. e316-tr_at_ajdrake.com. From the Catalog: "A study of Shakespeare's major plays. Units (3). Prereq: English 101 or equivalent. English 316 is a required course for the Bachelor of Arts degree (and for a minor) in English, and it serves as a prerequisite for English 416, an advanced seminar in Shakespeare. I will use +/- grading. Students who need special accommodations should contact the Disabled Student Services Office in UH 101 or call (714) 278-3117.

Required Texts at Titan Bookstore

Evans, G. Blakemore et al., eds. The Riverside Shakespeare. 2nd edition. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997. ISBN: 0-395-75490-9.


OPTIONAL RESOURCES TO HELP YOU DO WELL

Instructor & Student Blogs | Class Sessions in MP3 Audio | Guides | Offsite Links.


COURSE RATIONALE AND PLAN

Course Policies. Please review early in the semester.

Course Objectives. This course covers Shakespeare's selected Sonnets and a broad selection of his comedies, histories, tragedies, and romance plays from around 1593 to 1611, the consensus date for The Tempest, one of Shakespeare's later dramas. My goal is to offer students an effective introduction to some of the central themes and styles in Shakespeare's plays, with some attention given to the historical and cultural factors that inform them.

Major Study Units. The course will follow a roughly chronological order. While it's possible to structure a survey or major author course thematically and assign texts to groups based on certain unifying themes, my preference has long been to employ temporal succession as a more or less neutral principle of arrangement. In surveys and broadly-gauged major-author courses, I prefer to approach literary works without relying too heavily on teleological or exclusionary interpretive schemes. Such schemes, I find, tend to force a degree of continuity upon literary works that may actually prevent us from discovering what is most valuable about each one, taken individually. My preference is (insofar as possible) to establish connections freely as I proceed, not rigidly or far in advance.

Classroom Activities. Lecture, student presentations, and discussion when students pose questions or offer comments to me or to the entire class. I encourage such questions and comments; thoughtful student participation immeasurably improves any course, broadening its scope and introducing a variety of opinion that wouldn't be available otherwise. A key point: my lectures improve significantly when students take an active part in the class: I remember to mention things I might have forgotten to say, and sometimes make connections I hadn't thought of. My tasks are to lecture concisely, to listen well, to ask good questions, and to help you find out more about the texts we study. Your tasks are to listen, respond, and develop your own ideas, your own "voice," as a reader of literary works. In humanities study, insightful interpretation and an ability to make interesting connections between one author or concept and another are central goals.


HOW YOUR PERFORMANCE WILL BE EVALUATED

Presentations Requirement. Students will sign up for two* 5-minute in-class presentations on authors of their choosing (if possible). I will provide presenters with specific questions from the online journal questions and will post a schedule on the Presentations page. Each session will feature one or more presentations. Required: At least one week before you present, contact me to discuss your ideas. After you have given your in-class presentation, email me a version of your comments and I'll post it as a new entry to the appropriate collective students' blog. Other students may, if they wish, access the entries as they're added by visiting the appropriately named link on the Course Blogs Index Page. Your emailed version should resemble your class comments, but need not be identical. (Please don't use "fancy" formatting -- avoid indentation and bulleted lists.) 20% of course grade. *Three if small class size warrants.

Journals Requirement. Responses to a choice of questions on each author. Due by email anytime on class day Week 5, Week 11, and Final Exam Day. Electronic format required. (30%)

Term Paper Requirement. By November 15th (Week 13), a one-paragraph description addressing the topic and argument of the projected paper will be due by email. (Full rough drafts are also encouraged.) Not providing this description on time may affect the final draft grade. Please read the term paper instructions carefully since they contain the prompt and advance draft comments. I reserve the right to require proof of the final paper's authenticity, such as notes or an early draft. Final draft (5-7 pages; graduates 10-15 pages) due by exam day or as specified towards the bottom of the syllabus page. Follow MLA guidelines. CSUF academic integrity policies apply (see UPS 300.021). For undergraduates, research is optional; graduate papers should respond to primary texts and secondary criticism; see CSUF Library. See Resources/Guides/Writing Guides: MLA, Grammar, Deductive, Citing, Analyzing, and Editing. (30%)

Final Exam Requirement. The exam will consist of substantive id passages, mix-and-match questions (match phrase or concept x to author/text y), and short questions requiring a few paragraphs in response. There will be more choices than required responses. Books and notes allowed for all sections, but no laptops. Exam date: see below. (20%)

Emailing Journals/Paper/Presentations to e316-tr at ajdrake.com. Email journals, presentations, and term paper as attachments. Don't send more than one document in the same email. Label subject lines appropriately: "E316-TR Journal 1, Jane Smith" etc. You can paste journal sets into a regular email or send them as an attachment. (Journal "sets" include responses to questions about several authors; do not send entries on each author in a given set separately -- responses on the relevant authors should be combined into one document.) Contact me if you don't receive an email confirmation within approximately three days.


STUDY QUESTIONS FOR JOURNALS AND PRESENTATIONS

The Sonnets | The Taming of the Shrew | Richard the Second | Romeo and Juliet | A Midsummer Night's Dream | I Henry IV | The Merchant of Venice | Julius Caesar | Hamlet | Twelfth Night | Othello | King Lear | Antony and Cleopatra | The Winter's Tale | The Tempest.


SESSION SCHEDULE: FOLLOWING WORKS DISCUSSED ON DATES INDICATED


WEEK 1

08/21. Introduction to Course and to Wiki Features.

08/23. Selected Sonnets (1593-1609). Pages 1843-71, but only the following are assigned: 15-16, 20, 30, 35, 41-42, 55, 60, 73, 77, 83, 87, 88, 94, 97, 106-07, 110-11, 116, 124, 129-30, 133-34, 138, 144. *Note: page numbers throughout don't include the 3-5 page Riverside introductions, which are suggested reading.

WEEK 2

08/28. The Taming of the Shrew, Acts 1-3 (1593). Pages 142-60.

08/30. The Taming of the Shrew, Acts 4-5 (1593). Pages 160-71.

WEEK 3

09/04. The Tragedy of King Richard the Second, Acts 1-3 (1595). Pages 847-69.

09/06. The Tragedy of King Richard the Second, Acts 4-5 (1595). Pages 869-79.

WEEK 4

09/11. Romeo and Juliet, Acts 1-3 (1595). Pages 1104-29.

09/13. Romeo and Juliet, Acts 4-5 (1595). Pages 1129-39.

WEEK 5

09/18. A Midsummer Night's Dream, Acts 1-3 (1595). Pages 256-72.

09/20. A Midsummer Night's Dream, Acts 4-5 (1595). Pages 272-80. Journal Set 1 due by email.

WEEK 6

09/25. The First Part of Henry the Fourth, Acts 1-3 (1596). Pages 889-913.

09/27. The First Part of Henry the Fourth, Acts 4-5 (1596). Pages 913-23.

WEEK 7

10/02. The Merchant of Venice, Acts 1-3 (1596). Pages 288-308.

10/04. The Merchant of Venice, Acts 4-5 (1596). Pages 308-17.

WEEK 8

10/09. Julius Caesar, Acts 1-3 (1599). Pages 1151-69.

10/11. Julius Caesar, Acts 4-5 (1599). Pages 1169-78.

WEEK 9

10/16. Hamlet, Acts 1-3 (1600). Pages 1189-1218.

10/18. Hamlet, Acts 4-5 (1600). Pages 1218-34.

WEEK 10

10/23. Twelfth Night, or What You Will, Acts 1-3 (1601). Pages 442-66.

10/25. Twelfth Night, or What You Will, Acts 4-5 (1601). Pages 466-74.

WEEK 11

10/30. Othello, Acts 1-3 (1604). Pages 1251-75.

11/01. Othello, Acts 4-5 (1604). Pages 1275-88. Journal Set 2 due by email.

WEEK 12

11/06. King Lear, Acts 1-3 (1605). Pages 1303-29.

11/08. King Lear, Acts 4-5 (1605). Pages 1329-43.

WEEK 13

11/13. Antony and Cleopatra, Acts 1-3 (1606). Pages 1395-1421.

11/15. Antony and Cleopatra, Acts 4-5 (1606). Pages 1421-34. Paragraph describing Term Paper topic and argument due by email.

WEEK 14

11/20. Thanksgiving Holiday, no classes all week.

11/22. Thanksgiving Holiday, no classes all week.

WEEK 15

11/27. The Winter's Tale, Acts 1-3 (1610). Pages 1617-33.

11/29. The Winter's Tale, Acts 4-5 (1610). Pages 1633-51.

WEEK 16

12/04. The Tempest, Acts 1-3 (1611). Pages 1661-78.

12/06. The Tempest, Acts 4-5 (1611). Pages 1678-86.

FINAL EXAM

Final Exam Date: Thursday, December 13th 2:30-4:20 p.m. in class. Journal Set 3 and the Term Paper will be due by email attachment on or before Friday, December 21st. (I must turn in grades by Wednesday, January 2nd, 2008.) For your other courses, check CSUF's Final Exam Schedule.


Created by admin. Last Modification: Thursday 21 July, 2011 07:46:43 PM PDT by admin_main.

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